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Year End Update: #MustReadin2016

Year End Update: #MustReadin2016

mustreadin2016challenge

#MustReadin2016 is a personal challenge to commit to reading books of your choice.  Visit creator Carrie Gelson’s site here for more information and for links to other #MustReadin2016 book lists. 

In 2016, I created a Must Read list of 12 books that had been recommended by my reading community and set a goal of reading 100 books by the end of the year.  I read 11.5 of the 12 Must Read books (halfway through The Thing about Jellyfish) and met my goal of reading 100 books (barely!) with the 101st book completed on December 31st. Highlights from my Must Read list, which you can find here, included Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate and Wish Girl by Nikki Loftin, which I enjoyed reading with my sons, as well as Personalized PD by Jason Bretzmann, which has greatly influenced my work with teachers this year.

As I reflected on participation in this personal reading challenge, I realized that I have gained valuable insight into how to cultivate reading communities for our students. Rather than reviewing the books on my list, I believe the real take-away is to consider how the lessons I learned from this experience can influence the ways in which we approach reading in the classroom.

Lesson #1: Set goals but allow adjustments.

For me, the goal to read 100 books in 365 days was lofty but gave me a target to shoot for.  When fall came around, I was teaching grad school and the kids soccer schedule suddenly equated to practice or a game every day of the week (yes-all 7 days!). I felt anxious that I wouldn’t meet my goal. Self-talk related to my reading goal became pretty negative.  How could I possible meet the goal I had set, given the limited time I now had for reading? I adjusted my goal to 75 books, which I felt was achievable. Once I hit 75, I talked myself back into that goal of 100 and ended up accomplishing it.  However, I believe that meeting the loftier goal is due to the fact that I could adjust it to a more manageable number when I felt stressed about meeting the deadline.

Questions for Reflection:

  • What systems are in place for students to set reading goals in the classroom?
  • Do students have the ability to reflect on and adjust their goals, or are they fixed targets?

Lesson #2: Lack of choice is detrimental to developing a reading identity. 

I believe choice is the number one motivational factor in accomplishing a reading goal. If someone had handed me a list of books and declared them to be the Must Reads of 2016, I would never have completed this challenge, even if the books were outstanding and even if they were books I would have been likely to choose on my own.  The power is in the choosing.  In fact, I didn’t look at the 12 books that I had deemed Must Reads and check them off one by one.  If I had, I would have missed The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill, Raymie Nightengale by Kate DiCamillo, The Night Gardener by Terry and Eric Fan, Orbiting Jupiter by Gary Schmidt, and Mindsets and Moves by Gravity Goldberg, which turned out to be some of my 5-star ratings this year. I learned that I needed to read “off list,” even the list I had made for myself. Again, the power is in the choosing.

Questions for Reflection:

  • What is the balance between the percentage of books that students are assigned to read versus the percentage of books that they choose to read?
  • What happens when a student dislikes a book that they have chosen or wants to read “off-list”?

Lesson #3: Access to a large volume of books is critical. 

To increase the volume of reading, one must have access to various avenues for obtaining reading material. Sources included the public library, school book fairs, bookstores, online vendors, conferences, colleagues, and friends. I read audio books, eBooks, and good old-fashioned print.  I read in the car, on vacation, and in the doctor’s office, using an iPad or a phone.  If access to these sources had been removed, my reading goal would not have been attainable.

Questions for Reflection:

  • How much time are students spending looking for books that could be spent reading if high interest books were easily accessible?
  • How can we increase access to books both within and outside of school?

Lesson #4: A system for tracking progress is necessary.

My system of choice is Goodreads.  I was able to use the goal-setting, logging, and rating features to track my reading progress and estimate how close I was to my goals.  Goodreads allows users the capability of keeping lists of books, indicating books to be read, books read, and books categorized into customized lists. I could keep track of genre or recommended ages of readers and create lists for my kids. At any time, I could mark a book as completed or enter the number of pages read to track measurable progress. Most importantly, all of this tracking was done by myself, for myself.  Others could view my progress, but the only person holding me accountable was me.

Questions for Reflection:

  • How are students tracking their reading progress? Do students have ownership of this system?
  • Are options in place that are consistent with the way adults track progress toward goals?  Are they authentic?

Lesson #5: A reading community encourages and inspires an authentic reading life. 

Books beg to be discussed, to be written about, to be shared. A reading community provides a forum for recommending your next read, cheering you on as you work toward your goals, sharing reviews that showcase the uniqueness that each reader brings to the experience. Goodreads friends, as well as the “Must Read” and “It’s Monday, What are You Reading” groups, have served as in-person and online communities in which books are honored and readers are celebrated.

Questions for Reflection:

  • How are reading communities cultivated within the classroom?
  • How can we strive to create a space in which authentic discussion around books is the norm?

I’m kicking off 2017 with another goal of  reading 100 books and have started with some that I have been waiting to read for quite awhile: Ashes by Laurie Halse Anderson, Pax by Sara Pennypacker, and Who’s Doing the Work? How to Say Less So Readers Can Do More by Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris. I’m putting the finishing touches on my #MustReadin2017 list and welcome your recommendations for my next reads!

The book is in your court…

IMG_4918Visit Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to participate in the #IMWAYR community.

 

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Summer Learning Plans- #IMWAYR

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The arrival of summer brings family adventures, celebrations with friends, lazy days near the water, and late nights centered around kids, s’mores, and fireflies. But for many educators, the time off also provides the much-needed time to rejuvenate through continued learning and reading.

The following posts from the connected educator community jump-started my own planning for summer reading and continued personal and professional growth.

  • Leigh Anne Eck from A Day in the Life shares her summer learning plans and  invites other educators who have a passion for learning to collaborate on a Google Slide presentation to capture the variety of experiences available.
  • Betsy Hubbard breaks her summer learning plans down by month in this post from Two Writing Teachers.
  • Donalyn Miller outlines the #bookaday challenge here. To participate, set your own start and end date, read an average of a book a day during that time period, and share your reading via a social media site of your choice.
  • Throughout the year, at There’s a Book for That, Carrie Gelson shares titles that both she and her students enjoy. You’ll find recommendations for a variety of genres and categories, including diverse books and nonfiction.
  • Fran McVeigh is on her second week of learning at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Institute and blogs about her take-aways at Resource-Full.

Inspired by this group of connected educators, as well as my colleagues who are also on a continual quest to learn and grow, I made sure to take advantage of learning opportunities this summer. Keep an eye out for future posts where I will share my learning from:

In the meantime, I’ve tried to create a balance with my summer reading plans to ensure that I’m always reading something for students, something for teachers, and something for no particular purpose at all. Below are my three current reads:

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Stella by Starlight (from my Must Read in 2016 list)- From Goodreads: “Stella lives in the segregated South; in Bumblebee, North Carolina, to be exact about it. Some stores she can go into. Some stores she can’t. Some folks are right pleasant. Others are a lot less so.” Read more here.

 

Mindsets and Moves– From Corwin Press: “What if you could have an owner’s manual on reading ownership? What if there really were a framework for building students’ agency and independence? …Consider Mindsets & Moves your guide. Here, Gravity describes how to let go of our default roles of assigner, monitor, and manager and instead shift to a growth mindset. Easily replicable in any setting, any time, her 4 M framework ultimately lightens your load because they allow students to monitor and direct their reading lives.” Read more here.

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All the Light we Cannot See– From Goodreads: “From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.” Read more here.

Consider sharing your Summer Learning Plans and/or the books on your summer reading list!  The book is in your court…

#MustReadin2016 is a personal challenge to commit to reading books of your choice.  Visit creator Carrie Gelson’s site here for more information and for links to other #MustReadin2016 book lists. Visit Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to participate in the #IMWAYR community.

Personalized PD- #IMWAYR

Personalized PD- #IMWAYR

 

The main road and gateway to civilization!

4 days of being cooped up due to record-breaking snowfall has provided ample time to dive into the pile of books that has been accumulating since winter break!

My first choice- Personalized PD: flipping your professional development

If there is ever a time for personalized professional development, the time is now. Teachers and support staff are working under increased expectations with limited time to learn and grow as professionals.  We cannot afford to waste the time of any educator with one-size fits all professional development when we have the tools to personalize the learning experience, just as we do when we differentiate for our students.

I “met” Jason Bretzmann in a personalized PD session during EdCampVoxer in December.  When I learned that the Maryland State Department of Education had chosen this book for a book study spanning over the next few months, I immediately added it to my #MustReadin2016 list. EdCampVoxer was the prime example of personalized learning- sessions created the first day of the event by the participants, choice, collaboration, differentiation, and the flexibility to come and go as needed. I was living the principles that underlie the movement toward personalized PD and that are described in this book.

Jason’s group assembled an outstanding group of leaders in education to create this guide, including Kenny Bosch, Brad Gustafson, Brad Currie, Kristen Daniels, Salome Thomas-El, Dave Burgess and more.  You’ll also find vignettes by Kristen Swanson, Kristen Ziemke, Todd Nesloney, Joe Mazza, and many others. This group of educators has been using educational technology to accomplish the goals of personalized PD by flipping staff meetings, hosting EdCamps, and creating asynchronous learning communities.

You will read about both the strategies and the tools used to personalize professional learning by starting where each educator is and helping them to move forward.  As Jason writes, “The bottom line is they can’t end up where they started.” This concept is something that I have been wrestling with, and the examples provided here have helped me to refine my vision of how I can make the most of the face to face time we have with educators.

I hope you take the time to check out this resource! The book is in your court…

Personalized PD.jpg

#MustReadin2016 is a personal challenge to commit to reading books of your choice.  Visit creator Carrie Gelson’s site here for more information and for links to other #MustReadin2016 book lists. Visit Teach Mentor Texts and Unleashing Readers to participate in the #IMWAYR community.

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